Residential Aged Care

Resident Health Tips

  • winterhealthtips_rslcaresa

    winterhealthtips_rslcaresa

    View post

Resident Wisdom and Health Tips you can count on.

People have tips for everything these days, but the tips carry a greater weight from those who have the longetivity to prove their wisdom.

We recently asked some of our beautiful residents what their Winter Health tips were and documented their response below. These three residents are over 100 years old…now that is some wisdom worth listening to.

Collie's Winter Health tipsCollie – 106 years young

Have a teaspoon of apple cider vinegar morning and night and tell jokes to keep yourself warm.

Collie turned 106 years old on June 27th. He’s been our resident for the last 16 years.

Other tips from Collie include:

  1. Sit in the morning sunlight
  2. Drink 4 cups of coffee

Peggy's Winter Health Tips Peggy McKinnon – 99 years young

To stay active by cheering on the Crows to win every weekend and stay rugged up to keep yourself warm.

Peggy recently turned 100 and is waiting for her letter from the queen with great anticipation.

Peggy's Winter Health TipsPeggy Howarth – 100 years young

I come from good stock and I have a daily walk around the block.

Peggy Howarth

If you’ve been looking for some winter health tips from centenarians, then you can now tick off your health bucket list.

The common themes between the three include:

  • Apple Cider Vinegar
  • Friendship and Sunlight
  • Stay Warm
  • Love who you are and keep your spirits high.

Need a place to stay warm this winter in the company of great people? Drop in to Huey’s Cafe at Myrtle Bank open Monday through Saturday.

The New Aged Care Quality Standards

  • New Aged Care Standards_low

    New Aged Care Standards_low

    View post

Organisations providing Commonwealth subsidised aged care services are required to comply with the new Aged Care Quality Standards from 1 July 2019.

The Quality Standards focus on outcomes for consumers and reflect the level of care and services the community can expect from organisations that provide Commonwealth subsidised aged care services.

The Quality Standards are made up of eight individual standards:

1.   Consumer dignity and choice
2.   Ongoing assessment and planning with consumers
3.   Personal care and clinical care
4.   Services and supports for daily living
5.   Organisation’s service environment
6.   Feedback and complaints
7.   Human resources
8.   Organisational governance.

Each of the Quality Standards is expressed in three ways:

  • a statement of outcome for the consumer
  • a statement of expectation for the organisation
  • organisational requirements to demonstrate that the standard has been met.

To watch a video regarding the New Aged Care Quality Standards, please click on the link here. Or to visit the Australian Governments website please click the link here.

Along with the New Aged Care Quality Standards is a new simpler Charter of Aged Care Rights. The Charter will make it easier for aged care consumers, their families and carers to understand what they can expect from an aged care service provider, regardless of whether they are in residential care or receiving care in the home. Consumer responsibilities have also been revised. These changes will support aged care service providers in delivering care to consumers and provide protection for the aged care workforce. Commencing 1 July, providers will be required to assist consumers to understand the new Charter and invite them to sign it. This provides an important opportunity for providers and consumers to enter into a partnership.

To view the new Charter of Aged Care Rights, please click here.

The Janus Approach

  • Janus Approach logo_website

    Janus Approach logo_website

    View post

The Janus Approach is a philosophy of care, specific to RSL Care SA, that acknowledges residents are unique individuals, who have a variety of personal needs and preferences.

The Janus Approach is named after the Roman God Janus, the god of beginnings and endings, transitions, doorways and time. Janus frequently symbolised change and transitions such as the progress of past to future, from one condition to another, from one vision to another, opening a new door and commencing that journey.

The Janus Approach aspires to continually improve and enhance the quality of life with all residents by transforming the culture of care in our facilities from task focussed to truly person-centred. The approach enables services and care needs to be adapted to meet the priorities and ‘picture’ of quality of life for each individual resident as well as the group of residents as a whole. Residents of RSL Care SA require care delivery to be person centred and evidenced based ensuring each resident’s physical, cultural, psychological, social, sexual and spiritual needs are addressed.

In order to deliver the Janus Approach, we have identified specialty areas of care provision which are addressed through the ‘Janus Keys’. The leader for each respective ‘key’ is accountable for maintaining current evidenced based practice and applying this in the performance monitoring of care delivery to residents. We currently have six Janus Keys:

In addition to the Janus Keys, Janus Dignity Principles have been developed in partnership with residents, representatives, floor staff, management and the Board of RSL Care SA.

To read more about our Janus Approach, please click here.

The Janus Keys

  • Rslcaresa_Januskeys

    Rslcaresa_Januskeys

    View post

The Janus Approach is a philosophy of care, specific to RSL Care SA, that acknowledges residents are unique individuals, who have a variety of personal needs and preferences. In order to deliver the Janus Approach at RSL Care SA, we have identified speciality areas of care provision which are addressed through the ‘Janus Keys’. The leader for each respective ‘key’ is accountable for maintaining current evidenced based practice and applying this in the performance monitoring of care delivery to the residents of RSL Care SA. We currently have six Janus Keys and have intentionally designed this model so that as the approach matures and the needs of residents’ change, additional ‘keys’ can be added.

DIGNITY AND PERSON CENTRED CARE

“To me it is important to have the same routine I would have if I still lived in my own home… I like to read the paper with a coffee in the morning before I start my day”

Margaret, War Veterans Home Resident

The Janus Approach ensures that a comprehensive life history or “Life Story” is gathered for each resident in partnership with the resident and families who wish to be involved. From this life story and with resident and family collaboration, staff are able to determine what quality of life means to each resident. Life stories are taken by staff who have received specific training in this area of assessment and are generally conducted over several weeks as a relationship of trust is built with the individual resident (or family). Dignity for each resident is promoted through an understanding of their individualised goals of care, personal preferences and individual ‘life story’. Staff are assisted to familiarise themselves with these ‘life stories’ in order to deliver the appropriate care as well as adhere to RSL Care SA principles of dignity. These principles were developed in partnership with residents, representatives, floor staff, management and board of RSL Care SA.

MEANINGFUL AND ENGAGING PROGRAMS

“The thing I notice the most is the attention to detail given to the recreational opportunities offered. The staff always put in a big effort to make events special for us”

Kath, RSL Villas Resident

The Janus Approach recognises the need for social and leisure time programs as an integral part of daily living, however programs should have purpose through enhancing and strengthening the physical and psycho-social capabilities of the resident and increasing self-esteem and self-worth. Through this Janus Key we ensure that residents have a wellbeing program that is designed to promote each resident’s independence consistent with individual abilities and wishes, thereby promoting dignity and self-respect. Residents have the choice and opportunity to participate, or not, in programs and to change their mind regarding their preferences. Programs may be active or passive, formal or spontaneous according to the requirements of the individual. They may be provided for a group of residents with common interests, or for an individual to support their own personal interests and abilities.

SPIRITUAL CARE AND CONNECTEDNESS

“Spirituality is a very important part of my life. I believe that there is something in all of us that knows more than we do, and if we follow that line, we will be safe”.

Robert, War Veterans Home Resident

The Janus Approach recognises that all residents have spiritual needs which may not always be based on religious belief or lack of belief. Spirituality is the way we seek and express meaning and purpose; the way we experience our connection to the moment, self, others, our work and the significant or sacred. (Meaningful Ageing Australia 2014). This Janus Key recognises that the need for spiritual comfort can vary along an individual’s life journey. Needs can change when a resident is faced with emotional challenges and significant sense of loss, which can be associated with a move to a new environment, changed circumstance or adjusting to life in an aged care setting. Staff gain an understanding of what spirituality means for each individual and support resident’s spiritual care needs. These also include cultural practices, customs and rituals that residents have undertaken throughout their life and are not isolated to a country of birth

MENTAL HEALTH

“Mental health is important to maintain and improve upon for our residents because it underpins their overall wellbeing, social interactions, and ability to live out a happy and meaningful life”

Kane, Veteran Support Officer

Mental health illness and disorders are as important as physical care needs and often have as great an impact on physical and social wellbeing. Some examples of mental health conditions experienced by residents within RSL Care SA are depression, anxiety and confusion. These can be suffered by any resident at any time, and individuals respond differently to these conditions and staff work with residents and families to support residents diagnosed with these conditions, ensuring that all staff are aware of how to support residents to achieve the best outcome in-line with the resident’s goals of care.

SEXUALITY AND INTIMACY

“The opposite of Loneliness is not Togetherness , It’s Intimacy”

Richard Bach, Author

The Janus Approach recognises that the need for love, affection, physical closeness and contact continues throughout life, including for residents who are living within an aged care setting. People living in an aged care facility will often still have sexual desires and be capable of acting on those desires, as well as having a need to express themselves sexually, however, this may be difficult for residents to disclose as it has always been a topic kept private or only shared with people they trust. As part of this Janus Key and an individual resident’s quality of life, it is also important to understand the level of intimacy they need or desire. Support to achieve emotional connection and intimacy at any level are developed with the resident (or family), to support each individual resident’s need for intimacy and sexual expression in whichever form this may take.

PALLIATIVE APPROACH

“Good Palliative Care is about quality of life for those living with a life limiting or terminal illness. It is about helping a person to be as comfortable as they can, so they can live as well as possible. “Leaves grow old gracefully, bring such joy in their last lingering days. How vibrant and bright is their final flurry of life.” (by Karen Gibbs)”

Lynne, Palliative Approach Advocate

The Janus Approach adheres to the Palliative Approach in Residential Aged Care (2005). This approach ensures that residents with life limiting illnesses are afforded quality of life throughout their journey within the residential aged care setting. This Janus Key affirms life and respects dying as a normal process. It neither hastens nor postpones death, but rather aims to enhance the quality of life whilst also positively influencing the course of the illness. This Janus Key also recognises that there are three very distinct phases of palliation (greater than 6 months to live, less than 6 months to live, and end of life approaching within a week) and ensures that within each phase the resident is provided with:

  • Autonomy, dignity, comfort and respect
  • Honest, open discussion about conditions and treatment options
  • Access to any available evidence-based treatment options
  • Effective management of pain and other distressing symptoms
  • Quality of life, as defined by them, in the circumstances
  • Assurance that any cultural or spiritual wishes will be upheld
  • Access to the people they wish to be present

Our staff will meet with residents and families on admission and throughout their admission period to ensure that staff and families have a sound understanding of the type of care the residents wishes to be delivered at each stage of palliation.

72 Bed Licenses obtained for Murray Bridge

  • Murray River, Murray Bridge

    Murray River, Murray Bridge

    View post

Residential aged care in Murray Bridge

72 Bed Licences obtained in the latest Aged Care Allocation Round (ACAR)

At the end of 2017, RSL Care SA purchased the Waterford Estate Retirement Village in Murray Bridge. The seamless transition has seen residents and staff at Waterford quickly become part of our RSL Care SA family.

Part of the Waterford Estate acquisition, was a large block of vacant land on the site. Board and management viewed this as an opportunity to increase our residential aged care offerings, while providing a much needed service to the Murray Bridge community.

Our vision became viable when the government announced an Aged Care Allocation Round (ACAR) late in 2018. This meant residential aged care facilities could apply for additional bed licences. Traditionally ACAR rounds have been very competitive with only a select number of bed licences released. In fact, RSL Care SA was unsuccessful in obtaining additional licences through this process in a previous round.

So, it is with great pleasure that we advise of our success in securing 72 new bed licences for our organisation. Our intent is to build a brand new Residential Aged Care facility on the vacant land at Waterford Estate (subject to the necessary council approvals).

RSL Care SA Chief Executive Officer, Nathan Klinge will be conducting several community forums in Murray Bridge in the near future to discuss our plans. The details of these meetings will be announced in due course, however if you have any queries in the interim, please do not hesitate to call our Corporate Office on 08 8379 2600.

Understanding Residential Aged Care Fees and Charges

  • Understanding RAC fees and charges

    Understanding RAC fees and charges

    View post

Residential Aged Care fees vary depending on an individual’s assets and income. RSL Care SA offers a number of accommodation options across all facilities, from platinum single rooms with private ensuits to share rooms with an ensuite. Accommodation fees vary depending on the accommodation type.

To ensure prospective residents with low assets and income are not disadvantaged from being offered permanent placement, accredited aged care facilities must reserve a percentage of their beds for ‘low means’ residents.

Asset and Income Assessment and Thresholds

Residents who are eligible to receive subsidised aged care fees are required to submit an Asset and Income Assessment to the Department of Human Services (Centrelink). Please see below for current asset and income threshold levels and the applicable fees:

ASSET & INCOME FREE THRESHOLD – Low Means Resident

Assets between $0.00 and $49,000, and Income below $26,985.40

  • Basic Daily Care Fee only
FIRST ASSET & INCOME THRESHOLD – Low Means Resident

Assets between $49,000 and $166,707.20, and income below $52,036.40

  • Basic Daily Care Fee
  • Accommodation Contribution
ABOVE FIRST ASSET & INCOME THRESHOLD – Financial Resident

Assets above $166,707.20 and income above $52,036.40

  • Basic Daily Care Fee
  • Accommodation Payment
  • Means Tested Care Fee

Figures shown reflect the Department of Health ‘Schedule of Fees and Charges for Residential and Home Care’ from 1 January 2019.

Fees and charges explained

BASIC DAILY CARE FEE

The Basic Daily Care Fee (BDCF) is paid by everyone. It is set by the Commonwealth Government and is approximately 85% of the single Aged Pension. The BDCF covers all living expenses and contributes to the costs of other services such as meals, personal care, recreation activities, laundry, cleaning and nursing care

Current daily rate $50.66

MEANS TESTED CARE FEE

The Means Tested Care Fee (MTCF) is paid by residents who exceed the government’s first assets and income threshold. As the BDCF does not cover 100% of the costs incurred by an aged care facility in providing its services, residents who are deemed to have the financial means are required to contribute more towards the cost of their own care. The MTCF varies depending on the asset and income level of the resident.

Current maximum daily rate $216.59                  Annual Cap $27,232.33                   Lifetime Cap $65,357.65

ACCOMMODATION CONTRIBUTION

The Accommodation Contribution is paid by Low Means residents only. It is reviewed quarterly and is subject to change; however a resident will not be required to pay more than what is advised from their asset and income testing. The facility has restrictions on how much it may charge based on its Low Means resident ratio and whether or not the facility is newly refurbished. The Accommodation Contribution may be paid as a lump sun equivalent, known as a Refundable Accommodation Contribution, which is 100% refundable.

Current maximum daily rate $56.59

ACCOMMODATION PAYMENT

The Accommodation Payment is paid by financial residents only. The price is set by the facility in accordance with government provisions and is nonnegotiable. RSL Care SA offers a range of accommodation prices:

War Veterans’ Home                                                                                 RSL Villas

$225,000 – Double shared with ensuite                                            $350,000 – Premium private single with ensuite

$275,000 – Standard private single with ensuite

$450,000 – Premium private single with ensuite

$550,000 – Platinum private single with Ensuite

There are three accommodation payment options to consider:

1. Refundable Accommodation Deposit (RAD)

The RAD option means paying the accommodation payment to the facility as a lump sum. RAD payments are 100% refundable and government guaranteed. RAD payments are invested securely by RSL Care SA and the interest received is used to cover accommodation costs.

2. Daily Accommodation Payment (DAP)

A DAP is when the accommodation payment is paid on a periodic basis (monthly). It is calculated as a daily payment by applying the government’s maximum permissible interest rate (MPIR) to the Accommodation Payment.

Current MPIR = 5.94%

3. Combination of both RAD and DAP

It is possible to combine the RAD and DAP payment options. The DAP will be calculated on the unpaid portion of the RAD. It is also possible for the DAP to be withdrawn from the RAD payment.

What Is Right For Me?

Moving into residential aged care is an important life decision and each person is coming from their own unique circumstances. For this reason, RSL Care SA is unable to give financial advice or provide specific guidance as to which option may be right for you.  We strongly encourage you to seek independent financial advice to ensure you choose the right option for your circumstances.

Please contact our Admissions Team on 8379 2600 for more information, or to book a private tour of our aged care facilities.
To place your name on our residential aged care waiting list, please complete our Application Form

Serving those who served

  • Defence Ensign

    Defence Ensign

    View post

RSL Care SA is privileged to share the extraordinary military experiences, stories and recollections of some of our veteran residents.

It is always a privilege to have ex-service men and women access temporary or permanent accommodation through RSL Care SA. Our Andrew Russell Veteran Living (ARVL) program offers emergency and affordable housing accommodation options to contemporary veterans, while our Retirement Living and Residential Aged Care facilities offer accommodation to the elderly.

We are in a unique position to hear so many different stories about our residents military experiences. We think it’s important to share these stories with others as a reminder to be thankful for the freedom we experience today because of the ongoing service of others. We will be adding to this post regularly and hope you enjoy learning about our veterans as much as we do!

Flying Officer, Alex McKinnon

Alex enlisted with the Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF) in September 1941 at the age of 18. His initial training was at Fort Breckan Victor Harbor in the same intake as Keith Miller the famous Australian cricketer. Further training took place on Prince Edward Island Canada before being shipped to Brighton in the UK. After a short time in the UK, Alex was shipped to the Middle East where he was assigned as a Navigator to RAAF 459 Squadron. This squadron was located at an airbase called El Berka just out of Benghazi in Libya. Alex (Navigator) and three other crew members (Pilot, Wireless Operator and Gunner) flew Baltimore Bomber aircraft over the Mediterranean and Aegean Seas bombing German shipping and supplies as well as missions to Rhodes and Crete. In total Alex flew 28 sorties with 176.5 hours of flying.

Alex returned to Australia at the completion of the War as a Flying Officer, achieving the following Honours and Awards: 1939-45 Star, Italy Star, Defence Medal, War Medal 1939-45, Australian Service Medal 1939-45, Returned from Active Service Badge.

 

Squadron Leader, Murray ‘Lyne’ Skinner

Lyne enlisted in the Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF) on the 5th of December 1940 at the young age of 19, accompanied by his older brother John. After some initial training in Pearce and Cunderdin in Western Australia, Lyne was singled out as a pilot and sent to Sommertown on Prince Edward Island in Canada for the next stage of training, which would ensure he was at the standard level required for the Operational Training Unit in England. Lyne finished his training in the United Kingdom in Wiltshire, Chivenor and Devon.

Lyne’s first operation, as leading Aircraftman, was on the 14th of May 1942.  While it was quite an uneventful mission (unexpectedly cut short), it did not foretell the many hours of flying and ‘heart stopping’ moments that were to come. Lyne had several postings across the United Kingdom, the Western Desert in Egypt, Malta and Italy.  His missions included submarine operations, enemy patrols, dinghy searches, reconnaissance, navigation and even a mine laying operation! While Lyne flew many aircraft’s during his time in the RAAF, his favourite by far was the Spitfire.

Lyne’s last posting was with RAF 683 Squadron based at Stan Severa, Italy. In 1945 he was discharged as Squadron Leader, having achieved a whopping 1,114 hours (and 35 minutes) of flying.

Sadly, Lyne’s brother John was killed in a Blenheim crash in Kenya in 1941, never to return home.

Read the full account of Lyne’s service history on the Flight Publishing website at the following link (pages 28 to 39) http://www.raafa.org.au/sites/default/files/Wings%20Winter18-V2.pdf

 

Flying Officer, Colin Watt OAM, DFM

Colin Watt OAM DFM flew Lancaster aircraft with Bomber Command in WWII. Colin completed 25 missions totaling over 170 flight hours and was awarded the Distinguished Flying Medal for his extraordinary service in exceptionally trying circumstances. Only three of the 14 pilots Colin trained with survived the war. The below photo was taken on the 29th of September 1942, with Colin flying the lead aircraft! Sadly, the two planes accompanying him were shot down shortly after this photo was captured.

 

Colonel Donald Beard AM, RFD, ED (Ret’d)

After completing his medical degree Donald Beard volunteered as a Medical Officer in the Army in 1949 serving in Japan and treating evacuated soldiers from Korea with the British Commonwealth Occupation Force. Donald Beard was due to return to Australia on the 27th June 1950, but 4 days before his departure he was recall to his base unit where he reluctantly volunteered to serve in Korea. He served as Regimental Medical Officer during the famous 3rd Battalion (Old Faithful) in the Battle of Kapyong. The Battle of Kapyong involved a 15,000-strong Chinese division attacking the Australian, British and Canadian Battalions and the New Zealand 16th Field Regiment in two days and nights of fierce fighting near Seoul. Donald returned to Australia in December of 1951.

Donald was chosen as a member of the Australian contingent to attend and march in the coronation service of the Queen Elizabeth II in London on 2 June 1953. Part of a world goodwill tour lasting 5 months. In 1968, Donald again found himself serving in a war zone at Vung Tau Base, Vietnam. Donald had a long and distinguished career as a Doctor which included being the medical officer for the South Australian Cricket Association (SACA). Donald’s extraordinary life has been documented by Ashley Mallett in the Wakefield Press book called ‘The Diggers’ Doctor, the Fortunate Life of Col. Donald Beard AM, RFD, ED (Ret’d)’. Donald very kindly signed 2 copies of his book while he was with us for 5 weeks of respite in August 2017. We look forward to having him back later this year!

 

 

Applying for an ACAT Assessment

  • How to apply for an ACAT assessment

    How to apply for an ACAT assessment

    View post

Accessing Residential Aged Care

RSL Care SA has two government funded residential aged care (nursing home) facilities; the War Veterans Home in Myrtle Bank, and RSL Villas in Angle Park. To access government funded services, such as respite and permanent care, you must first be approved for aged care by the Australian Government’s Aged Care Assessment Team (ACAT).

ACAT assessors are qualified professionals such as nurses and social workers. An ACAT can provide approvals for residential respite care, permanent residential care, and home care services. Depending on the types of services that are needed, ACAT will either conduct an interview over the phone, or will arrange a time to meet with the client in their own home.

Register for an ACAT assessment

ACAT’s are managed through the Australian government’s My Aged Care. There are three ways to register for an ACAT Assessment:

  • Phone – Please call My Aged Care on 1800 200 422 and speak with a representative
  • Online – Please visit the following link to make a referral online https://www.myagedcare.gov.au/referral
  • GP – your GP or health care professional can provide a referral for an ACAT

ACAT assessments are FREE and a My Aged Care Client Record will be created. The initial referral can be made by anyone, however the person who the assessment is for will need to give their consent if a representative is required throughout the entire assessment process.

If you would like help in making a referral, please call RSL Care SA on 8379 2600 and a member of our admissions team will be happy to submit an online referral on your behalf. Your assessment results will not be provided to an organisation without your approval.

Many people have ACAT assessments done for peace of mind should there be a sudden change in their health or care needs. If you decide to apply for an ACAT assessment, there is no requirement to use the services that you have been approved for.

The ACAT Assessment process

  • Make a referral (online or over the phone)
  • ACAT will call the nominated contact person and arrange a time to conduct a short phone interview to assess the clients eligibility to access aged care services
  • During the initial phone interview ACAT will ask for details of the clients medicare card number and GP. The client will need to be available at the phone interview to give consent for a representative to speak on their behalf
  • At the conclusion of the phone interview ACAT will arrange a time for a formal assessment to take place in the clients own home
  • At the home interview ACAT will ask lots of questions about the clients health, care needs and other concerns. Learn more about what happens during an ACAT assessment here
  • Assessment results are usually processed within a few days (this can be done more quickly if the matter is urgent) and a letter will be sent to the client with information on the services they now have access to

The Aged Care Assessment Team can arrange for an urgent assessment for those who need it. Otherwise the entire assessment process usually takes about two-three weeks.

What’s Next?

To be offered a respite or permanent bed at an Aged Care Facility, or to be placed on a waiting list, the facility will usually ask to see a copy of the ACAT assessment. This is also known as a ‘My Support Plan’.  At the back of the My Support Plan are referral codes that relate to each of the services a person has been approved for. Aged Care facilities can look up the My Support Plan online using these codes.

If you have had your ACAT assessment and would like to be placed on RSL Care SA’s residential aged care waiting list, please complete our application form here.

Our Admissions team are always happy to answer any queries you may have regarding ACAT assessments or care options, so please feel free to call (08) 8379 2600 during office hours – Monday to Friday 9am – 5pm.

Free flu vaccinations for RSL Care SA employees

  • CEO Nathan Klinge receiving his Flu vaccination

    CEO Nathan Klinge receiving his Flu vaccination

    View post

Free Flu Vaccinations

As an organisation providing care and services to the aged in our community, RSL Care SA happily supports the Federal Governments legislation on staff Flu vaccinations in aged care facilities. Minister Wyatt moved the legislation earlier this month, and it is now a requirement for all aged care facilities to have a staff influenza vaccination program in place, with an anticipated vaccination rate of 95% for the industry.

RSL Care SA strives to create a safe environment for all who visit our aged care facilities, but especially for our beloved residents. By encouraging a high community uptake of flu vaccination within our community, we can significantly reduce the risk of spread to our elderly and often vulnerable residents from this deadly virus.

Our Flu vaccination program for all staff commenced on the 30th of April, with CEO Nathan Klinge first in line to receive his flu vax. Over the coming weeks we will be encouraging all employees to have their flu vaccination, which is provided free of charge.

Read more about the influenza vaccine from SA Heath here 

Read more of RSL Care SA’s latest news here

 

 

Getting To Know Our Volunteers

  • Volunteers

    Volunteers

    View post

Volunteers of RSL Care SA

RSL Care SA is privileged to have a wonderful, rapidly growing database of passionate volunteers. All of our volunteers are highly valued and seen as a vital part of our organisation. Thanks to the generosity of our volunteers, we are able to offer a range of versatile activities and services that enrich the lives of our residents.

To demonstrate just how important volunteers are to our organisation, we will be posting regular interviews with our volunteers showing exactly what it is they do and why.

SANDRA PAVIA

Sandra Pavia is our Volunteer Coordinator and has been working at RSL Care SA for over 12 months.  Working closely with the residents, Sandra has been able to tailor volunteer services to suit their various needs. Having a dedicated Volunteer Coordinator has seen our volunteer database double over the last year! We currently have 34 active volunteers, and of course we are always looking for more! See Sandra’s interview below:

What sorts of activities do volunteers do with our residents?

Volunteers participate in a range of different activities with our residents, such as; companionship and social support; assistance on outings or shopping; driving the bus for resident outings; beauty therapy services such as manicures; organising or assisting with participation in activities; Pastoral care and faith support; assistance with wellbeing initiatives and providing pet therapy engagement with residents to list a few

We also have volunteers who provide support in areas such as the kitchen, garden and maintenance.

Volunteers with the right qualifications are also able to go into specialised areas such as Andrew Russell Veteran Living (ARVL), which is our program for younger veterans who are homeless or at risk of homelessness.

Why do you think volunteers are so valued at RSL Care SA?

We value our volunteers because we recognise the critical role they play in supporting and enhancing the lives of our residents and hope that they gain as much enjoyment from their volunteering as our residents do. Volunteers also support the organisation in fulfilling its mission and vision.

What benefits do you see to the resident’s from having volunteers visit regularly?

Volunteers are able to focus on the resident’s individual needs at the time of their visit, spend quality time with them, nurture friendships, sit and listen, embrace natural reminiscing and support residents social connections.

How do you become a volunteer at RSL Care SA?

To volunteer at RSL Care SA all you need to have is a desire to contribute to the enhancement of our residents lives, an ability to commit as little as one hour per week, and undertake the necessary approval processes required to work in Aged Care.

GEORGIE ORCHARD

It’s so wonderful when children and young people have a heart for the elderly and a desire to give up their time to help others. We accept volunteers of all ages, especially if they are as sweet as Georgie! Watch her interview below.

BETH COTTON

What made you decide to become a volunteer?

I thoroughly enjoy being in the company of older people. I love chatting with them and listening to their stories. I always come away from my visits feeling very blessed!

What is your role as a Volunteer at RSL Care SA?

I buddy a resident who has severe memory loss, helping out as needed. It is a privilege to help someone who is vulnerable, even if it’s just providing some extra company or offering a listening ear. I also attend the ‘chair exercise’ group and assist the residents throughout the class, which I thoroughly enjoy.

What is your favourite thing about volunteering?

I enjoy spending my time with people who have lived amazing lives. The residents all have stories to tell and listening to what they have to say adds colour to my life. There is an old saying “as we refresh or bless others we are ourselves refreshed”, and I couldn’t agree with this more!

ANNE MILLER

Anne is our wonderful Art Facilitator. Watch her interview below!

SUSAN KUKESTE

How long have you been volunteering at RSL Care SA?

I have been volunteering at RSL Care Myrtle Bank since March 2016 so just over 2 years.

What made you decide to become a volunteer?

After finishing full time employment I still needed to work. I have been involved in and contributing to community throughout my life. Growing up in the country that was a given. In my early years I was involved with Nursing Mothers Association of Australia as a counsellor and group leader. Once my children were at school I became involved in school life – supporting student needs, fundraising and pastoral care support to parents. I volunteered with Teen Challenge for several years and have continued with voluntary work through group work and pastoral care associated with my church life.  The opportunity to volunteer at Myrtle Bank and work with the Chaplain and Lifestyle in Pastoral Care Support was a good fit. So here I am.

What activities do you do with the residents?

Most of my time and involvement is visiting with the residents offering a listening ear, friendship, general chit chat, and conversation, wherever that might take us. At times I join in with planned activities. A very important part of my week is supporting the weekly Sunday Church Service. Assisting residents to get there and return home, leading services and giving a message are all part of what I do- who I am.

What is your favourite thing about volunteering?

Following the loss of my mother in 2015 I reflected on the shortcomings of life for the aging in our society, particularly people becoming more isolated and people in care. I hoped to make a difference and contribute in a way that would count and be meaningful for individuals. Having studied and trained as a Chaplain I hoped to utilize this in whatever I took on in the future.

As a pastoral care person I talk with and get to know people. Some people are happy with a brief ‘how are you, hope you are well’. Others like to share their stories and have someone take interest in their lives and develop relationships with them. I have the privilege of hearing incredible stories, beautiful stories and in so doing one can only recognise and marvel at the resilience and courage and beauty of so many. Everyone has stories to tell.

We all need to tell those stories and learn of one another –  that’s how we grow, that’s how community happens. I am enriched and challenged by the privilege of sharing in the residents’  life journeys.

JIM RICHARDSON

Jim has been volunteering at the War Veterans Home in Myrtle Bank for about nine months and is a wonderful addition to our Veterans Support Group. Watch his interview below!

If you wish to enquire further about volunteer opportunities, please contact Sandra Pavia on 8379 2600. Sandra will be happy to schedule a time to meet with you and discuss your areas of interest.

About us

RSL Care SA believes that the ex-service community deserves the best care and affordable accommodation. RSL Care SA is an independently constituted not for profit organisation with links to the Returned & Services League of Australia (SA Branch).

Our mission is to support veterans and their dependents, although the ex-service community are our primary client group it is not exclusively so. The facilities and services are also available to the broader community.

Read More
Back to top